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Mass Changes in the U.S.

Some Recommended Books On The Mass

 

On tonight’s episode of Following The Truth, I mentioned that there are several good books to help you better understand the Mass. Here are a few that I recommend:

Why I’m Glad That I Said “And Also With You”!

Maybe I shouldn’t admit this publicly, but I did slip up and say “and also with you” at Mass today.  Although I understand that this is the first day that we’ve used the new Roman Missal, I really should know better.  I’ve blogged about the changes, devoted radio shows to them and  have been looking forward to these modifications for a few years.  Unfortunately, I’ll probably slip up again at daily and Sunday Mass.  Rather than beat myself up about saying the wrong response, I’m actually thankful that it happened (and will continue to happen).  Why?  Not because I want to look like a dope, but because it’s teaching me a valuable lesson.

Every time  I proclaim “and also with you” instead of “and with your Spirit” it tells me that I’m zoning out and not paying attention at Mass.  While that’s not a good thing, awareness of that fact is the first step to recovery.  The Mass is the most important activity that takes place on earth and we want to make sure that we’re there mentally as well as physically.  At every Mass, we are mystically transported to Calvary and are able to share in the offering of Jesus by offering our lives to the Father.  We are also able to receive numerous graces through our worthy participation. 

Did you mess up and say the wrong response today?  Instead of feeling bad, be thankful for the reminder that you were slipping into “auto pilot” mode and use it as motivation to pay better attention each Sunday.  What better way to begin the season of Advent than by realizing that we have some work to do!  In this holy season, we focus on preparing to meet the Lord.  Guess who appears at every Mass?  You got it…the Savior of the world!  Paying closer attention and participating more fully at Mass is an excellent way to get ready for the coming of the Lord when you receive Him in Holy Communion.  Don’t miss the opportunity!

Resources For New Mass Translation

As mentioned on today’s radio program, here are some resources that will help you to better understand the changes taking place at Mass beginning on November 27, 2011 in the Unites States:

Welcoming The Roman Missal by the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (online resources)

A Biblical Walk Through The Mass by Dr. Edward Sri

A Guide To The New Translation of the Mass by Dr. Edward Sri

Mass Revision by Jimmy Akin

Know of any other good material?  Send me an email (gary@followingthetruth.com) or post a comment.

Upcoming Mass Changes…Are You Ready?

While the actual Mass is not changing, beginning on Sunday, November 27th, what we say and hear at Mass (in the United States) will sound a bit different.  In order to help you prepare, I’ll be devoting 3 of  my Following The Truth BlogTalkRadio programs to a discussion of what’s changing.  We’ll review the differences in what the people say, what the priest says and discuss some of the reasons for the changes.  Understanding these modifications can definitely help you better appreciate what is taking place at Mass, so don’t miss out! 

Listen to Following The Truth on BlogTalkRadio beginning Monday, November 7th  thru Wednesday, November 9th at 8 PM Eastern time or download the podcast from the BlogTalkRadio archives or iTunes.

Confused About The Mass? Have I Got A Book For You!

One of the most common problems among Catholics is a lack of understanding of the Mass.  A large number of Catholics believe that we go to Mass because “it’s what Catholics do” or for fellowship and preaching.  Without the proper background, most of the prayers heard at Mass don’t really help us to understand what is taking place.  What’s with all the sitting, standing and mysterious wording?  In reality, what goes on at every Mass is an incomprehensible miracle.  We are mystically transported 2,000 years in the past to Our Lord’s crucifixion at Calvary.  Even more astonishing is the fact that we not only get to witness Jesus’ sacrifice to the Father for our salvation, but we get to offer ourselves along with Him.  If that’s not enough, at Mass we receive the grace we need to one day get to Heaven!

Unfortunately, unless you already know what I just said, it’s hard to figure that out from the prayers of the Mass.  In reality, however, just about every prayer said at Mass has a Biblical origin.  Knowledge of this fact can go a long way in understanding what takes place at Mass.  Still the question remains…how can we understand the wording and the Biblical references?  One positive development is that, beginning in Advent of this year, some of the prayers of the Mass will be changing to more appropriately reflect the original Latin wording.  This is a good thing because, with proper explanation, this wording will help us to see the Biblical connection and to better understand what is taking place at Mass.

Still not excited?  Fortunately, I have some even better news!  I’ve recently run across one of the best and easiest to understand books on the Mass that I’ve ever seen.  A Biblical Walk Through The Mass by Dr. Edward Sri (2011, Ascension Press) not only explains the parts of the Mass in layman’s terms, but illustrates the Biblical origin of the prayers.  Those of you who are familiar with Dr. Sri’s work will find the same simple, but substantial, approach used in his other writings.  Divided into 24 short chapters (each corresponding to one part of the Mass), you’ll find this to be a difficult book to put down.  Time and time again, you’ll find yourself saying, “So that’s why we do that”! 

Even better is the fact that this book is part of a parish education series, which includes DVDs, CDs, student and leader guides.  It would be a perfect resource for parish study groups and will not only address the new Mass translation, but the entire liturgy.  There is a great need for a package such as this and it couldn’t be released at a better time.  With many parishes looking for resources that explain the new translation, this is the perfect answer.

I have stated before (and I still believe) that the only reason people leave the Catholic Church is due to a lack of understanding of what we believe, especially the Mass.  I hear a lot of talk about miracles and the desire to witness one.  Sadly, a miracle takes place each day on the altar of every Catholic church but is often unnoticed.  Do yourself a favor and check out this book (and all of the materials) so that you’ll have a better understanding for the greatest event that takes place on earth – the Mass!

What Do You Mean The Mass Is Changing?

Being someone who is very much “into” all things Catholic, I sometimes forget how I approached my faith 10 or 15 years ago.  To summarize, my position was, “I’ll go to Mass, but don’t bother me with any of that religious stuff outside of Church”.  Actually, I’m being a little hard on myself, I would sometimes pray when I needed something 🙂  Sounds like a good, healthy spiritual life, doesn’t it?  In reality, that position summarizes the approach of most Mass-attending Catholics.   

Why do I  bring this up?  I was reading an interesting article over at the Our Sunday Visitor website, which stated that (according to a recent survey) most Catholics in the United States are unaware of the Mass revisions that will be take effect on November 27, 2011.  While there are multiple reasons for this ignorance (lack of interest, lack of  enthusiasm of clergy, the fact that you have to actually read the parish bulletin instead of just taking it home, etc.),  it’s still something that should be addressed.  

Here goes…

If you live in the United States, you will soon be saying some different responses at Mass.  These changes will take effect on November 27, 2011.  In addition, the priest will be saying some different things as well. 

While the changes aren’t drastic, they are important.  If explained properly, these changes will help you to better understand what is taking place at Mass.  And that is a GOOD thing!  I hope you check back here often over the next few months, as I’m going to spend a lot of time addressing the new responses.  While I promise to use simple language, I will make sure you get the important concepts. 

Here’s a link to the article from OSV and, if anyone asks, you can now say you know about the Mass revisions!